Xxx irani 18

Physically Manekji was a compact and sturdy man, able to endure the rough conditions of life and travel then prevailing; and to devotion to his faith and community he added admirable innate qualities; charity, honesty, adaptability, tact and patience in negotiation, and what was of prime importance, both moral and physical courage.He had some protection, it is true, from his British citizenship; but the efficacy of this was not always great, especially in remote districts.He himself obtained an audience of the Shah, Nasiru'd-Din Qajar, after which, as a result of his skilful advocacy, the total sum due from the community was slightly reduced.Manekji devoted a part of the Society's funds to meeting the tax still exacted for those unable to pay ; but it was not until 1882, after it quarter of century of arduous campaigning, that the tax was finally abolished by royal firman, the Shah decreeing moreover that "in levying tithes and assessments on water and landed property, and all trade-dues, the Zoroastrians must be treated in the same manner as our other subjects".Browne states that the tolerance shown by some at least of the Zoroastrians towards the Babis may well have been encouraged by "the marked predilection towards the Babis displayed by Manakji , at whose instigation the It is impossible to believe, however, that Manekji ever wished to encourage an interest in Babism to the point of apostasies among his own community; and his predilection was presumably a manifestation of his natural intellectual curiosity, combined with a general interest in religion proper to one born and bred in India.From his headquarters in Tehran Manekji continued to be active down the years in Yazd and Kerman.He and his son Hormuzdiar were both on occasion threatened with death; Despite all dangers, and to the foreigner, Manekji set himself promptly and tirelessly to improve the lot of the small Zoroastrian community, shrunk in numbers, as he sadly records, so as to be no more than a pebble in the great heap of Muslim wheat; He labored both on the spot, in Yazd and Kerman, and at the distant center of power, Tehran; and by 1864 he was able to say, of the Tehranis at least, that though "the Muslims according to their creed looked upon a person of a different faith with the eye of contempt now they have abandoned this evil fashion, and have shown kindness and love towards this humble traveller".Manekji was not, however, the man to spend himself solely in patient diplomacy while practical tasks needed urgently to be done.

There is only occasionally a record of his attempts.(Her father himself, helped by his Parsi hosts, returned thrice to Yazd and succeeded in bringing his whole family to Gujarat.) Framji Bhikaji aided "with body, mind and money" those Iranians who reached Bombay, and it is said that he earned the right to be called "the father of the Irani Parsis".; and twenty years later his third son, Meherwanji, began a second fund to aid the Iranian Zoroastrians in their own land, and became one of the founders of the Society for the Amelioration of the Condition of the Zoroastrians in Persia (of which Khurshedji Nasarvanji Kama was honorary treasurer from its inception).These dakhmas replaced older ones, and were a part of Manekji's work of preserving or restoring tradition.He repaired other subsidiary buildings, and also subsequently acted as the agent for individual Parsi benefactors who had shelters erected for pilgrims, and water-tanks made, at the mountain-shrines of Banu-Pars and Pir-i Sabz.In 1865 Manekji had a small dakhma built at Qanat-ghesan.

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